Chief objects to Oti as name of new region

The chief of Nkonya Bumbulla, Nana Kwabena Osei Brakatu I, has kicked against Oti as the name for the new region to be carved out of the Volta Region.

He has, therefore, proposed North Akan Region as the appropriate name since the new region to be carved out is predominantly inhabited by Akans.

According to him, the inhabitants of the area are Guans, Ashantis, Akyems and Kwawus who migrated to settle in that part of the Volta Region.

“My worry is that we are ethnic Akans in the northern part of Volta Region; therefore, we have to highlight our heritage won for us.

“We should look into the proposed name Oti Region again and come out with a flourishing name that will enhance the life of the people in the newly created region,” he added.

He explained that River Oti has its spiritual dynamics and, therefore, one cannot play with its name as a common object.

“If the river is drying up, then the region is also drying up. We have to sit down again and look into the given name – Oti Region – before its final conclusion.

“Countries, regions, cities, towns and villages named after rivers and lakes on the African continent,” he added.
Nana Brakatu observed that countries such as Congo, Niger and Chad on the African continent were named after rivers and lakes.

He holds the view that these countries are struggling to progress, which reflects the impact the spirits behind the lakes and rivers are having on the countries.

To buttress his point, the chief of Nkonya Bumbulla referenced the Akan proverb “kayo bretuo mpo antumi angye wo, na kwaye mfofo na ebeyae wo den”, literally translated to mean if Lake Volta could not save us, how can River Oti save us.

“It is important as Akans to highlights our culture and traditions wherever we find ourselves, and also we have to protect our values and highly esteemed heritage won for us through the blood and toil of our forefathers”, he added.

Nana Brakatu stated that even though they are Akan-speaking people, their dialect has been influenced through the domination of Ewe language in school, church services and market centres.

“Now that the battle is ended, we have to stand and protect our images and show our colours of Akans,” he said.

Source: Kenneth O. ADADE || The Finder

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