Sex Tapes Et Al And Our Heritage Won For Us

A while ago, Ghanaians woke up to the news that one of the beloved daughters of our governess-general, H.E Sun Baohong, claims she has video coverage of what some of our high and mighty do behind closed doors, and beneath the sheets with some of the members of the fair sex from the nation of our new colonial masters. So far, we have not heard Governess Sun Baohong issue any statement on this. The last time she spoke, she decreed that we should never, in our lives, make any bad statement about her China and Chinese people; probably the revisit of False Report Act of the first republic.

Beautiful Asia Huang, popularly called Aisha, was alleged to have hand-picked 70,000 Chinese virgins and brought them down to Ghana to be catalysts in the illegal gold mining sector. All they have to do is to warm the bellies of otherwise sexual pensioners, and wake up their libidos so that they can perform like young stags.

The idea is for her to hold a trump card that could stop any move by any law-abiding officer of the state, who wants to halt her illegal mining. Certainly, with the message that the boss, the senior man himself, has been caught on video panting and drilling beneath the sheet like some equipment drilling oil, any attempts to halt her criminal business will be terminated, even without orders coming from above.

Then, suddenly, sex tapes started flying across the scene, with new pedigree Ghanaian porn stars being advertised, with such video were accompanying names of some high and mighty.  One of the first to drop down was allegedly a top member of Parliament (MP) and an ex-minister.

The problem was that his face was blurred, while his Chinese partner had her face very clear and sharp. The only sharp shot of this man was a shot taken of the back of head. It raises some doubts how his face was blurred in one shot, and his back was very clear in another.

The pictures did not look like photo-shop, only that when it mattered most, the villain’s face was blurred. I took the trouble to advise people not to share, but delete. And a friend reminded me of how rubbish I could sound for suggesting that. The last time I felt highly insulted, so when I meant good, was when my dear old father looked at me in anger one day, and said to me, “You are incorrigible.” A secondary form four student, who never bothered about reading story books, I took the word to a complement and felt proud that I was called incorrigible, until a year later when something prompted me to check the meaning. I felt sad and highly insulted about what my dear old daddy thought of me. Today, a bosom friend and I always laugh over this.

Now, if you cannot surely identify the actors and actresses on stage, and someone who means well advices against propagating the issue and you think it is rubbish talk, then you have my sympathy.

At any rate, even if it is true that these powerful politicians did what they were said to have done, I feel that we need not put too much blame on them, but rather look at Asia Huang and hang everything on her.  May I remind us all that, in Ghana, morality does not place center stage in determining the competence of an office holder.

But why do we delight in assisting this nation to go down whenever we find some fault in high places? I am not advocating for us to hush-hush when something bad happens within the arms of government. I am only suggesting that we find ways of dealing with such matters behind closed doors first, and if the desired effect is not got, then we can go public.

The other day, it came to light that some justices of the courts compromised their oath and sold justice for a pittance, in fact, it was not even about the highest bidder, it was about anything will do.

The news alone would have shaken the judiciary, and I was hoping that the issue will be dealt with behind closed doors, so that the overall integrity of our judicial system will not be dented. However, there was a public premiere of the compiled video clips of judges negotiating for a couple of goats and a few cedis put in white envelopes.

The result was that, ever since, when you see a judge sitting on a case and he starts saying things which are not too clear to you, you immediately start wondering whether his goat pen at home had not got new inmates. Or whether he is now able to fill his tank and drive around without the petrol gauge reading dangerously low.

Looking at the bigger picture, we have international bodies and other nations mocking us for having a compromised judiciary. And investors will be wondering whether it will be worth it investing in Ghana, with a weak and corrupted judiciary that can easily be compromised. And next time you see a foreign investor seriously negotiating for a couple of goats, you are not too sure whether he will be presenting them to some chief for a piece of land, or for a judge to win a case in court. This is how Ghana has gone low.

Human-trafficking is an international crime which ranks next to drug trafficking as crimes against humanity. Humans, mostly women and girls, are trafficked from one place to the other for sex trade. And falsifying your intentions of visiting a country on your immigration card is, in itself, a crime.

Keeping a brothel or a sex haven and operating prostitution is, in itself, a crime, I believe, and of course that makes one a pimp, which is an unlawful profession. Not declaring your profit from work that you do, so that you pay the appropriate taxes, is a crime called tax evasion, and it is a punishable offence.

Using all means within your means to lure someone to commit a crime is a crime called entrapment. And if you use this evidence as a trump card to have charges dropped against you for your own wrongful acts, or you expose the evidence, it is called blackmail, and is, in itself, a crime.

We have people just walking into our country and luring our chiefs, elders, high and mighty, politicians, security capos and what have you, to do anything they want, and instead of exposing these foreigners, we take delight in exposing our own, who are just exercising their waists under strong and irresistible coercion.

In the Ghanaian culture, they have not erred, so long as the women they engaged and interacted with in bed are not married. The only problems they will have include not to be trusted by their wives and in-laws. Church members will also hold them in high suspicion, to the extent that girls will be warned to stay clear of them. Which lady will like to joke with men who have been to the Mysterious East and back, and known everything in the deep dark forests there? Unless that girl in question has travelled far before.

From what is happening in Ghana, in view of the fact that we have and are willfully trading our heritage for a pittance, the emphasis must be more on driving out foreigners who have left their countries, which enjoy lush vegetation and pure water bodies, to come here and make a mess of our arable lands and waters. Let us deal with them first, before we turn to our own and ask them to recite the national pledge, with emphasis on…I Promise To Hold In High Esteem Our Heritage Won For Us Through The Blood And Toils Of Our Fathers… then we can deal with them as we deem fit. Seriously, if their fathers used their blood and toils to obtain and preserve heritage for us, then why should these men toil in bed to get their blood mixed with some bastard of a foreign whore? Is that in order?

To take our people on first is a show of weakness, and indicates that we have a fear of foreign villains.

Source: Daniel Dugan || The Chronicle

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