Which method of contraception is most effective?

“We want to educate and empower all women to find the best solution for their health, lifestyle, career, and family planning,"

Did you know 64.6% of South African women between 15 and 49 years use some method of contraception?1 While this figure may seem high, there’s still a significant information gap about contraception and how women can use it to empower themselves socially and economically

World Contraception Day, which takes place every year on 26 September, aims to do just that—highlight women’s right to make informed decisions on their sexual and reproductive health and to improve awareness of contraception safety and options.

“Unfortunately, there’s still a lot of stigma about contraception, which means many women are not comfortable or empowered to take control of their reproductive decisions and health,” said Dr Abofele Khoele, Managing Director, of Organon South Africa, a global healthcare company committed to educating and raising awareness on contraception, so that women can make informed choices to enhance their health and potential. “At the end of the day, the best contraception method is one that a woman will use correctly and consistently,” Khoele added.

Thanks to advances in medical science, women have so many options to choose from, from long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC’s) to short-acting methods. All have their benefits. “We want to educate and empower all women to find the best solution for their health, lifestyle, career, and family planning,” Khoele added.

Let’s use World Contraception Day to ignite an honest and open conversation and empower women of all ages to decide whether or when they would like to start a family. “Choosing the best contraception method does not need to be overwhelming. Visit idecide and talk to a health care professional about your needs now and your future hopes and goals and get the right information so you can make informed decisions,” Khoele added.

References: 1. Health-E News. Contraception in SA: What you need to know. https://health-e.org.za/2021/09/27/contraception-in-sa-what-you-need-to-know/. Accessed on 25 July 2022. 2. World  Health  Organization  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research  (WHO/RHR)  and  Johns  Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. 3. World Health Organization. Western Pacific. Region. What is the Best Way to Protect from Unintended Pregnancy?. Available at: https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/208327. Accessed June 2022. 4. World Health Organization (WHO). Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use. 3rd edition, 2016.Available at: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/252267/9789241565400-eng.pdf;jsessionid=5587A3665972B72C284C81FA2E8BF59A?sequence=1. Accessed: June 2022. 5. World Health Organization. Family planning/contraception methods. Updated June 2020. Available at: https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/family-planning-contraception. Accessed: August 2021. 6. Implants: In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p131–154. 7. Apgar BS, Greenberg G. Using Progestins in Clinical Practice. Am Fam Physician. 2000;62(8):1839–1846. 8. Copper-Bearing Intrauterine Device. In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p155–180. 9. Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device. In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p181–210. 10. Progestin-Only Injectables. In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p65–96. 11. Combined Vaginal Ring. In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p123–126. 12. Combined Patch: In: World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO/RHR) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Knowledge for Health Project. Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers (2018 update). Baltimore and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2018. p119–122. 13. Mayo Clinic. Birth control options: Things to consider. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/birth-control/in-depth/birth-control-options/art-20045571. Accessed on 22 July 2022. 14.Organon. Which contraceptive is right for me? http://cpages.idecide.co.za/microsite#Home. Accessed on 22 July 2022. ZA-NON-110173

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